Canadian scholars
Engaging ideas, transforming minds
Engaging ideas, transforming minds
2008 daily struggles cvr
312 pages
6.75 x 9.75 inches
April 2008
Print ISBN: 9781551303390
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Overview

Daily Struggles offers a unique, critical perspective on poverty by highlighting gender and race analyses simultaneously. Unlike previously published Canadian books in this field, this book connects human rights, political economy perspectives, and citizenship issues to other areas of social exclusion, such as class, sexuality, and disability.

Masterfully edited and presented in a logical, student-friendly fashion, Daily Struggles opens with theoretical frameworks that examine the racialization processes at work in Canada, with special attention to the consequences relevant to gender. The social construction of "race" and its subsequent devaluation and marginalization has several economic consequences for racialized individuals, especially racialized women. In section two, the economic consequences of race and gender are profiled, while the third section looks at how poverty, race, and gender are criminalized. The text also examines other ways in which racialized people—specifically women—are socially constructed to experience their lives as second-class Canadian citizens. The fourth and final section presents additional consequences of the racialized and gendered nature of poverty—consequences that have a fundamental impact on quality of life.

This new book is ideally suited for a wide variety of sociology, social work, and political science courses in the areas of social inequality and stratification, poverty, social policy and welfare, gender, race and ethnicity, and anti-racism.


Related Titles


Table of Contents

Part I: Theoretical Framework

Chapter 1: The Market Value and Social Value of Race, Peter S. Li
Chapter 2: Representation of the Immigrant, Rose Baaba Folson
Chapter 3: Selling (out) Diversity in an Age of Globalization, Yasmeen Abu-Laban and Christina Gabriel
Chapter 4: Regulating Native Identity by Gender, Bonita Lawrence

Part II: Economic Inequality and Social Exclusion

Chapter 5: Social Exclusion: Socio-economic and Political Implications of the Racialized Gap, Grace-Edward Galabuzi
Chapter 6: Homeworking: Dream Realized—The Globalized Reality, Roxana Ng
Chapter 7: Immigrant Women Workers in the Immigrant Settlement Sector, Jo-Ann Lee
Chapter 8: Home(lessness) and the Naturalization of Difference, Nandita Sharma
Chapter 9: Foreign Credentials in Canada’s Multicultural Society, Lorne Foster
Chapter 10: Racism/Anti-racism, Precarious Employment, and Unions, Tania Das Gupta

Part III: Crime, Policing, Surveillance, and Social Exclusion

Chapter 11: The Racialized Impact of Welfare Fraud Control in British Columbia and Ontario, Kiran Mirchandani and Wendy Chan
Chapter 12: Data, Denials, and Confusion: The Racial Profiling Debate in Toronto, Scot Wortley and Julian Tanner
Chapter 13: Delinquency of Asian Youth in Canada, Siu-ming Kwok and Dora Mei-Ying Tam
Chapter 14: War Frenzy, Sunera Thobani

Part IV: Other Exclusion and Inequality

Chapter 15: If Low-Income Women of Colour Counted in Toronto, Punam Khosla
Chapter 16: Gendered Racial Violence and Spatialized Justice: The Murder of Pamela George, Sherene Razack
Chapter 17: The Social Construction of a “Drop-out”: Dispelling the Myth, George J. Sefa Dei
Chapter 18: Individual Freedom as a Social Commitment, Amartya Sen

Conclusion: A National Strategy to Address the Racialization and Feminization of Poverty

Appendix A: Canada’s Action Plan against Racism

Appendix B: U.N. Definition of Poverty

Maria A. Wallis

Maria A. Wallis holds a Ph.D. in Sociology, with specialties in anti-racism and social inequality. She has taught at King’s University College at Western University, McMaster University, Wilfrid Laurier University and York University.


Siu-ming Kwok

Siu-ming Kwok is Associate Professor in the School of Social Work at King's University College at Western University.


Reviews

"This collection is valuable in pulling together a range of readings in critical political economy and the racialized labour market. It presents a useful feminist political economy approach to issues of racialized inequality in Canada. Many instructors will find this collection helpful, primarily because it offers a strongly feminist focus."
—  Sylvia Hale, Chair, Department of Sociology, St. Thomas University

"This collection is valuable in pulling together a range of readings in critical political economy and the racialized labour market. It presents a useful feminist political economy approach to issues of racialized inequality in Canada. Many instructors will find this collection helpful, primarily because it offers a strongly feminist focus."

Instructor Resources


Adopt Daily Struggles and receive critical thinking questions for each chapter of the text.

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Student Resources


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