Canadian scholars
Engaging ideas, transforming minds
Engaging ideas, transforming minds
2017 administration ethics cvr
Canadian Scholars’ Press
450 pages
6.75 x 9.75 inches
May 2017
Print ISBN: 9781551309637
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Overview

Administration Ethics explores the foundations, framework, and practice of ethical decision making in healthcare administration and considers the Healthcare Administrator’s role in ethical management and health policy development. Throughout the text, Joseph Byrne demonstrates the relationship between the foundational concepts of ethics theory, principles, codes, and rights. He positions each concept as a step in the Four-Stage Decision Model to assist students as they evaluate – and later participate in – exceptionally complex ethical decision making. The practical, case-based structure will appeal to graduate and upper-level graduate students in Health Administration, Health Studies, and health-related Philosophy programs as well as healthcare professionals involved in administration and management, or working within policy and health ethics committees.

Features

  • each chapter contains critical thinking questions
  • the last chapter consists of nine different case studies involving ethical dilemmas: the first three are fully analyzed for illustrative purposes; the second three are afforded preliminary analysis, allowing the reader to determine the final decision; and the last three cases are unanalyzed, providing the reader an opportunity to complete a full case review


Related Titles


Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Preface

SECTION A: FOUNDATION OF ETHICAL DECISION MAKING

Chapter 1: Introduction to Health Administration Ethics
Concept
Theoretical Ethics versus Applied Ethics
Nonnormative Ethics versus Normative Ethics
Ethics versus Law
Code of Law versus Code of Ethics
Healthcare Ethics
Clinical Ethics
Administrative Health Ethics
Administrative Health Ethics versus Business Ethics
Executive Decisions, Ethical Decisions
Summary

Chapter 2: Theory of Ethics
Concept
Egoistic Theory
Authority Theory
Natural Law Theory
Virtue Theory
Deontological Theory
Consequentialism Theory
Summary

Chapter 3: Principle of Nonmaleficence
Concept
Harm
Duty
Standard of Care
Negligence
Vicarious Liability
Summary

Chapter 4: Principle of Beneficence
Concept
Obligation or Aspiration
Good versus Bad Intervention
Paternalism
Summary

Chapter 5: Principle of Autonomy
Concept
Respect for Autonomy
Obstacles to Autonomy
Right versus Duty
Consent
Types of Consent
Summary

Chapter 6: Principle of Justice
Concept
Distributive Justice
Competing Needs
More Needs, More Decisions
Procedural Justice
Evaluating Distributive and Procedural Justice
Summary

SECTION B: FRAMEWORK OF ETHICAL DECISION MAKING

Chapter 7: Code of Ethics
Concept
Integration of Principles and Theory
Aligning Codes of Ethics
Canadian Perspective
Summary

Chapter 8: Rights, Justice and Administration Ethics
Concept
Justice versus Right
Private Rights
Public Rights
Moral Rights
Balancing Rights
Rights, Principles, and Theories
Summary

Chapter 9: Model for Ethical Decisions
Concept
Model for Ethical Decisions
Application of Model
Summary

SECTION C: PRACTICE OF ETHICAL DECISION MAKING

Chapter 10: Organizational Culture and Ethics
Concept
Organization Design
Human Capital
System Operations
Ethical Leadership
Assessing Culture of Ethics
Value of Ethics Culture
No Right Answer, No Right
Summary

Chapter 11: Psychology of Decisions
Concept
Science and Art of Decision Making
Neurocognitive Heuristics
Social Persuasion
Ethical Drift
Managing Decision Making
Summary

Chapter 12: Contemporary Challenges: Ethical Cases
Case 12.1: Mercy Medical Centre and YourHealthcare
Case 12.2: Triangle Medical Institute and Accountability
Case 12.3: We Have a Problem and It Needs Fixing
Case 12.4: Too Close to Home
Case 12.5: Preparing for the Worst
Case 12.6: A Culture of Self-Interest
Case 12.7: What about My Rights!
Case 12.8: She Needs Someone to Make Her Decisions
Case 12.9: What Can You Tell Me About the Applicant?

Epilogue
Critical Thinking Questions
References
About the Author

Joseph Byrne

Joseph Byrne is a Professor and the Director of the School of Health Administration at Dalhousie University. He has received awards from the American Psychological Association and the Canadian Psychology Association. He has also received the Dalhousie University Pediatric Medicine Clinical Award.


Reviews

“A preponderance of issues in healthcare ethics faces our public and our healthcare leaders today—this book fills a gaping hole, increasing our understanding and identifying a way forward.”
—  Donald Juzwishin, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, and Director of Health Technology Assessment and Innovation, Alberta Health Services

“As Byrne argues in his book, the decisions we make about healthcare reveal our ethics. Therefore, all of those involved in healthcare decision making—executives, administrators, policy makers, clinicians, students, patients, and caregivers—will benefit from the practical advice offered in these pages. Sound ethical decision making is a cornerstone of safe and effective healthcare planning and delivery.”
—  Neil J. MacKinnon, Dean, James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy, University of Cincinnati

“As the shift in healthcare delivery focuses on improving value and outcomes, this book is timely as a new leading-edge reference for all those administrators faced with ethical decisions in a technology-driven, transparent, and real-time world.”
—  Pamela Winsor, Senior Director of Health Policy and Stakeholder Engagement, Medtronic Canada

Student Resources


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