Canadian scholars
Engaging ideas, transforming minds
Engaging ideas, transforming minds
2006 the indigenous experience cvr
366 pages
6.75 x 9.75 inches
November 2006
Print ISBN: 9781551303000
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Overview

The Indigenous Experience: Global Perspectives introduces upper-level undergraduate students to some of the richness and heterogeneity of Indigenous cultures. Written by top scholars in the field, the readings explore common themes and experiences of indigeneity that persist across geographic borders. The first section examines the processes of conquest and colonization, while the second section addresses genocide and the problem of intention. The remaining readings interrogate the social constructs and myths promulgated by colonialism and explore the politics of resistance, struggles for justice, and future models of constructive engagement.

The examples span the globe from the Indigenous nations of Turtle Island—such as the Plains Cree, the Haudenosaunee nation of Kahnawake, and the Métis—to the original peoples of the South Pacific, including Aboriginal Australians, the Maori of Aotearoa, and the Rapanui. Other Indigenous peoples represented in this volume include the Guaraní, the Saami, the Ainu, and the Ogoni people. Combining historical narratives with complex conceptual issues and strong pedagogical support, The Indigenous Experience is a welcome addition to the literature of Indigenous Studies.


Related Titles


Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction

PART I: COLONIZATION AND INDIGENOUS PEOPLES
Chapter 1: Indigenous Peoples – David Maybury-Lewis
Chapter 2: Trade, Slavery, and Colonialism – Grant McCall
Chapter 3: The Ecology of Ainu Autonomy and Dependence – Brett L. Walker
Chapter 4: Hawai'i Under Non-Hawaiian Rule – Michael Kioni Dudley and Keoni Kealoha Agard
Chapter 5: Colonizing Knowledges – Linda Tuhiwai Smith

PART II: COLONIALISM, GENOCIDE, AND THE PROBLEM OF INTENTION
Chapter 6: Extract from A Little Matter of Genocide: Holocaust and Denial in the Americas 1492 to the Present – Russell Means
Chapter 7: Settling In: Epidemics and Conquest to the End of the First Century – Noble David Cook
Chapter 8: Confronting Australian Genocide – Colin Tatz
Chapter 9: "Killing the Indian in the Child": Four Centuries of Church-Run Schools – Suzanne Fournier and Ernie Crey
Chapter 10: The Guarani: The Economics of Ethnocide – Richard H. Robbins

PART III: SOCIAL CONSTRUCTS OF COLONIALISM
Chapter 11: The West and the Rest: Discourse and Power – Stuart Hall
Chapter 12: Paths Toward a Mohawk Nation: Narratives of Citizenship and Nationhood in Kahnawake – Audra Simpson
Chapter 13: The Criminalization of Indigenous People – Chris Cunneen
Chapter 14: The Indians Are Coming to an End: The Myth of Native Desolation – Matthew Restall
Chapter 15: "We Must Farm to Enable Us to Live": The Plains Cree and Agriculture to 1900 – Sarah A. Carter

PART IV: THE INDIGENOUS STRUGGLE AND THE POLITICS OF INDIGENEITY
Chapter 16: Imagining Civilization on the Frontiers of Aboriginality – Anthony J. Hall
Chapter 17: Saami and Norwegians: Symbols of Peoplehood and Nationhood – Trond Thuen
Chapter 18: The New Politics of Resistance – Ronald Niezen
Chapter 19: Politics within the Metis Association of Alberta – Joe Sawchuk
Chapter 20: "Sovereignty" – An Inappropriate Concept – Gerald Taiaiake Alfred
Chapter 21: Indigeneity at the Edge: Towards a Constructive Engagement – Roger C.A. Maaka and Augie Fleras

Appendix: Relevant Websites

Roger C.A. Maaka

Roger C.A. Maaka is a Professor of Maori and Indigenous Studies at the Eastern Institute of Technology in Aotearoa (New Zealand). Formerly the Head of Native Studies at the University of Saskatchewan, he is a Maori expert and scholar. Dr. Maaka’s research interests include Indigenous peoples' quest for equity.

Race and Racialization, The Indigenous Experience

Chris Andersen

Chris Andersen is Métis from Saskatchewan, and Associate Professor at the Faculty of Native Studies, University of Alberta.

Race and Racialization, The Indigenous Experience

Reviews

[To date], there is no other focused text on racism, especially in the context of Canada, that 'takes on' the established orthodoxy of the liberal multiculturalist agenda of assimilation/cultural genocide of Indigenous peoples.

The editors of this book are to be congratulated for producing a powerful, timely, cross-disciplinary collection that reflects the richness and diversity of the Indigenous experience. The essays examine not only the local and national paradigms within which Indigenous societies and cultures have been traditionally understood, but also how these are linked to and interact with a broader colonial and transnational context.... This is an indispensable book. It will be an excellent classroom resource.... This book will assist both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, 'inextricably interlocked as partners to jointly explor[e] a post-colonial alternative for living together different without drifting apart.'

This book is a welcome addition to the literature. Perhaps its greatest strength is its breadth of coverage in terms of historical eras, colonizing powers, and the conditions and forces created by colonialism, as discussed by renowned authors.... This book does not shy away from the gory details of the colonial experience. As a result, colonialism does not come across as a mere academic abstraction; rather, it leaps off the page as a vivid reality.

"This book is a welcome addition to the literature. Perhaps its greatest strength is its breadth of coverage in terms of historical eras, colonizing powers, and the conditions and forces created by colonialism, as discussed by renowned authors.... This book does not shy away from the gory details of the colonial experience. As a result, colonialism does not come across as a mere academic abstraction; rather, it leaps off the page as a vivid reality."
—  J. Rick Ponting, Sociology Department, University of Calgary

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